Using an External Text Editor in Arduino IDE

Whenever I program an Arduino based project I would always use Sublime Text as my editor then compile and upload using the Arduino IDE. I prefer using Sublime Text as my Arduino Sketch editor as it gives more flexibility on color highlighting.

This post is a tutorial on how to use Sublime Text as an External Editor. It also answers the why, advantages and disadvantages of using External Editor.

In case you prefer to use Atom Text Editor than Sublime Text then you may still do so by opening your code on Atom Text Editor.

(Left) Sublime Text; (Right) Arduino IDE
Both editors are showing the same stripped down version of the Blink code.

Continue reading Using an External Text Editor in Arduino IDE

Setting Arduino .ino files to open as C++ files in Sublime Text

I have always preferred developing in Sublime Text especially for Arduino Projects since the syntax highlighting is better than doing it in Arduino IDE. Unfortunately, it is annoying to keep opening .ino files on Sublime Text then set the syntax highlighting to C++ (.cpp) on each file.

Luckily, there is a way to do this automatically so that whenever I open a .ino file it will always open with a C++ syntax highlighting in Sublime Text. Below are the steps on how I did it.

Modified version of the Blink code in Arduino IDE
Modified version of the Blink code in Arduino IDE

Note: My Sublime Text is configured to use the Color Scheme named Sixteen.


1. Open a .ino file in Sublime Text

In my case I created an Arduino Sketch, saved it then opened it in Sublime Text.  Continue reading Setting Arduino .ino files to open as C++ files in Sublime Text